Shift Series Recipes | Enchiladas

It’s time for another post about a meal from the Shift Series–this time, Enchiladas! We don’t actually witness this meal, but Cecelia references it as she is leaving for the grocery store while Leah is sunbathing with Megan in the front yard.

“I thought we’d have enchiladas for dinner tonight. Leah, you liked those, right?” Cecelia smiled warmly at me.

“Yeah,” I nodded enthusiastically. “They were awesome.”

“Good. I’ll see you girls in a bit. Don’t get sunburned.” She climbed into her beat-up truck.

Of course, shortly after this scene is when Megan and Leah sneak out and walk the two miles to Drake’s house in the middle of the night. Lots of almost kissing.

This  recipe was a family favorite of mine growing up, and you can change it in all kinds of ways to make it your own.

enchiladas

On hubby’s plate–he doesn’t like them at all, obviously.😉

So how do you make these “awesome” enchiladas?  It’s really simple:

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Bustle’s (super awesome) Romance Novel Month

Here’s how they explain it: “Beginning on August 1, Bustle will host Romance Novel Month, a celebration and examination of the romance novel genre.”

Pretty great, right?

The introductory article, entitled Bustles Romance Novel Month Celebrates a Genre Dominated by Strong, Smart Women, sets the tone for a Romance-Genre-Loving, pro-women, feminist romp of a good time for the month of August–and beyond. But more than that, it makes some strong, positive points about Romance fiction, many of which need to be heard and talked about so we can begin to untangle the stereotypes and misconceptions about the genre as a whole–primarily that romance authors chose the genre because they don’t have the chops to write other kinds of fiction. Nothing could be further from the truth.

But most of all, from the whole article, I love this quote:

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If you read the article, share your thoughts in the comments below! And/or if you read more of Bustle’s articles throughout Romance Novel Month, keep the conversation going! You can comment here, or tweet at me!

We teach our kids that women are dishonest. Really.

We don’t mean to do it–most of the time–but we do. And I might be part of the problem. But I’ll get to that in a minute.

First, Hello faithful readers!  I took the last couple of Fridays off from blogging–the first unplanned due to sick kiddos, the second due to being on vacation–but I’m back now, and with an interesting topic to discuss!

While on vacation, I read a 2013 article entitled “How We Teach Our Kids that Women Are Liars.” My initial reaction to the title was, ‘I think I see where you’re going with this’ and, at the same time, ‘nuh-uh!’–so, of course, I had to keep reading.   In essence, the article makes the case that, going all the way back to the bible, and through to the stories of today, women have been portrayed as dishonest, manipulative, deceitful, conniving.  And, you know, I think they might be right.

As someone who contributes to the vast collection of stories on earth, I’m dying to hear others’ thoughts, and to discuss. Do you think this is true?  So read the article and tell me what you think!

P.S. As I’m writing this, Carrie Underwood is on the television singing her new song “Church Bells” about an abused woman who kills her husband.
I swear, popular music would have us all believe that murder is the only solution available to a woman being beaten by her significant other. Unfortunately, sometimes that’s actually true (see various articles about the credibility gap between men and women and how it leads to women’s reports of violence or assault being downplayed or disregarded by authorities.) But the worst part is that these two things might feed each other, creating a self-perpetuating loop: songs about women murdering their abusive spouses are the result of too many women not being taken seriously when they try to report their abuse–likewise, the same songs contribute to the general sense of women being conniving, which leads to them not being taken seriously when they report their abuse.  And on, and on.